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    Inicio > Historias > Statistical Dynamics of Religions and Adherents

    Statistical Dynamics of Religions and Adherents

    Psicohistory is nigh. After the the Jihad algorithm, a paper titled as above has been uploaded to ArXiV. From the abstract:
    Religiosity is one of the most important sociological aspects of populations. All religions may evolve in their beliefs and adapt to the society developments. A religion is a social variable, like a language or wealth, to be studied like any other organizational parameter.
    Several questions can be raised, as considered in this study: e.g. (i) from a ``macroscopic'' point of view : How many religions exist at a given time? (ii) from a ``microscopic'' view point: How many adherents belong to one religion? Does the number of adherents increase or not, and how? No need to say that if quantitative answers and mathematical laws are found, agent based models can be imagined to describe such non-equilibrium processes.
    It is found that empirical laws can be deduced and related to preferential attachment processes, like on evolving network; we propose two different algorithmic models reproducing as well the data. Moreover, a population growth-death equation is shown to be a plausible modeling of evolution dynamics in a continuous time framework. Differences with language dynamic competition is emphasized.

    I wonder if the same applies to political parties. I remember to have seen a paper on Japanese political parties in ALIFE IV, which said that hybridization is the best way of surviving, which probably spells doom for religions, which only seem to split, instead of hybridizing.

    2006-12-12 19:46 | 2 Comment(s) | Filed in

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    1
    De: mewt Fecha: 2006-12-12 20:45

    Funny! Lots of weird papers out there recently, I prefer the one modelling the "leaving the toilet seat down" convention as an strategy for a competitive game...
    Which makes me wonder whether it wouldn't be most appropriate to model these problems (religions and political parties, I mean) as some kind of sum 0 game (different religions/parties playing for getting the highest percentage of adepts) rather than as a population growth-death.



    2
    De: Algernon Fecha: 2006-12-12 23:48

    which said that hybridization is the best way of surviving
    Lemme see if I understand this correctly: that statement comes to mean that all political parties tend to go straight toward the boring "center", no?

    So ideologies don't die after all: they just end up in the same entropic lukewarm broth!



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